Operation Iraqi Freedom, Fallen Heroes, Iraq War 03/19/03

Bryan A Burgess

Celeburne, Texas

March 29, 2011

Age Military Rank Unit/Location
29 Army SSG

2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault)

Fort Campbell, Kentucky

 Died at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked their unit with small arms fire in Konar province.

From The Fort Campbell Courier fortcampbellcourier.com 03/31/11

Staff Sgt. Bryan A. Burgess

Media Release
Six 101st Airborne Division Soldiers were killed Tuesday after receiving small arms fire in Kunar province, Afghanistan.
The Soldiers were assigned to 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team.
Killed were:
Sergeant 1st Class Ofren Arrechaga, 28, of Hialeah, Fla., entered the Army in February 2001 and arrived at Fort Campbell in July 2001. He was an Infantryman assigned to Bravo Company.
His awards and decorations include: Bronze Star Medal; Army Commendation Medal; Army Achievement Medal; Valorous Unit Award; Meritorious Unit Citation; Army Good Conduct Medal; National Defense Service Medal; Afghanistan Campaign Medal; Iraq Campaign Medal; Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal; Global War on Terrorism Service Medal; Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon; Army Service Ribbon; Overseas Service Ribbon; NATO Medal; Ranger Tab; Expert Infantryman Badge; Parachutist Badge; Air Assault Badge and Combat Infantryman Badge.
Arrechaga is survived by his wife, Seana Arrechaga and son, Alston Arrechaga of Clarksville; daughter, Tristian Arrechaga of Benton, Ky.; and parents Ofren and Marta Alvarez of Clarksville. 
Staff Sgt. Frank E. Adamski, 26, of Moosup, Conn., entered the Army in March 2005 and arrived at Fort Campbell in April 2009. He was an Infantryman assigned to Charlie Company.
His awards and decorations include: Bronze Star Medal; Army Commendation Medal; Army Achievement Medal; Army Good Conduct Medal; National Defense Service Medal; Afghanistan Campaign Medal; Iraq Campaign Medal; Global War on Terrorism Service Medal; Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon; Army Service Ribbon; Overseas Service Ribbon; NATO Medal; Parachutist Badge; Air Assault Badge and Combat Infantryman Badge.
Adamski is survived by his wife, Danielle Adamski and daughter, Victoria Adamski of Clarksville; father, Frank Adamski of Volutown, Conn.; and mother, Susan Adamski of Westbury, N.Y.
Staff Sgt. Bryan A. Burgess, 29, of Cleburne, Texas, entered the Army in March 2003 and arrived at Fort Campbell in September 2009. Burgess was an Infantryman assigned to Charlie Company.
His awards and decorations include: Army Commendation Medal; Army Achievement Medal; Army Good Conduct Medal; National Defense Service Medal; Iraq Campaign Medal; Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal; Global War on Terrorism Service Medal; Army Service Ribbon; Overseas Service Ribbon and Combat Infantryman Badge.
Burgess is survived by his wife, Tiffany R. Burgess; daughter, Makya Burgess and son, Zander Burgess, all of Fort Campbell, Ky. He is also survived by his mother, Linda Pearce of Keene, Texas; father, Terry A. Burgess and step-mother, Elisabeth Burgess, both of Fort Worth, Texas.
Specialist Jameson L. Lindskog, 23, of Pleasanton, Calif., entered the Army in August 2008 and arrived at Fort Campbell in April 2009. He was a Combat Medic, assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company.
His awards and decorations include: Army Commendation Medal; Army Achievement Medal; National Defense Service Medal; Afghanistan Campaign Medal; Global War on Terrorism Service Medal; Army Service Ribbon; Overseas Service Ribbon and NATO Medal.
Lindskog is survived by his father, Curtis Lindskog of Livermore, Calif. and mother, Donna Walker of Pleasanton, Calif.
Specialist Dustin J. Feldhaus, 20, of Glendale, Ariz., entered the Army in September 2009 and arrived at Fort Campbell in January 2010. Feldhaus was an Infantryman assigned to Charlie Company.
His awards and decorations include: National Defense Service Medal; Afghanistan Campaign Medal; Global War on Terrorism Service Medal; Army Service Ribbon; NATO Medal and Combat Infantryman Badge.
Feldhaus is survived by his mother, Nichol Etchells of Glendale, Ariz. and father, Bernard Mahaljevic of Maricopa, Ariz.
The name of the sixth fallen Soldier is being withheld until next of kin notification is complete.
A memorial service will be held in Afghanistan. Fort Campbell holds a monthly Eagle Remembrance Ceremony. The next ceremony will be April 13 at 4 p.m.
SSG Bryan Allan Burgess

SSG Bryan Allan Burgess, age 29 of Ft. Campbell, KY, died on Tuesday, March 29, 2011 in Kunar Province, Afganistan. He was in the US Army assigned to the 2nd-327 Infantry.

Funeral services will be held Friday, April 8, 2011 at 10 a.m., at the Memorial Chapel at Ft. Campbell, KY, with Chaplain Captain Avery officiating. Visitation will be Thursday from 4 to 8 p.m., at Neal-Tarpley-Parchman Funeral Home.

He was a member of the VFW and Texas State Guard. SSG Burgess was born April 23, 1981 in Ft. Worth, TX.

Survivors include his parents, Terry and Beth Burgess Ft. Worth, TX, and Linda and Randy Pearce, Keene, TX; his wife, Tiffany Burgess and his children, Zander Allan Burgess and Makya Renee Burgess, Ft. Campbell, KY; and a sister, Brandi Reynolds, Keene, TX.

Arrangements entrusted to Neal-Tarpley-Parchman Funeral Home, 1510 Madison Street, Clarksville, TN 37040; 
From ChristianPost.com 05/27/14

'The Hornet's Nest' Released: A Father Pays Homage to Fallen Son, Bryan Burgess (INTERVIEW + TRAILER)

By Sami K. Martin , Christian Post Reporter

"The Hornet's Nest" is not your typical military movie. It is actual footage taken from nine days of battle in Afghanistan and the perilous situation a group of soldiers found themselves in. Several men were killed in a dangerous and hostile environment, referred to as "The Hornet's Nest" by war photographer Mike Boettcher, who was embedded with the unit.

One of the men killed that day was Army Staff Sgt. Bryan A. Burgess, who is survived by his father, mother, sister, wife, and two daughters. His father, Terry Burgess, spoke with The Christian Post about their powerful relationship and the faith that kept him going after the loss of his son.

Christian Post: What was your reaction when you learned of "The Hornet's Nest" film?

Terry Burgess: Honestly, I was a little skeptical at first because I had no idea what kind of footage they had of Bryan. We got a phone call from Chaplain Roberts, who said he had footage of Bryan and had been asked to send it in, but he wanted our permission to do so first. And I trusted Chaplain Roberts, and then a couple of weeks later, we got a call from David Salzberg, Jr., who said he had a cut of the film that he wanted us to watch that had Bryan in it but he wanted us as a family to see it first before he went into production with it.

We drove to Dallas, sat in David's hotel room and he put in the DVD and left the room, and it was me and my wife, my ex-wife, and my daughter and we watched March 29 unfold right in front of us. I had the Army reports but they're still sealed and in Bryan's trunk. Now, here we are, watching the entire day, so it was a punch in the stomach. It was extremely hard to watch and then, as it sank in, we realized that this is why Bryan went over there to fight, what he volunteered to do … to fight for our freedom and our rights. It became something to be proud of.

CP: How did you feel about seeing him again?

TB: It was wonderful and heart-wrenching to hear his voice and to hear him talk about his children – to see him smiling. He's obviously having very happy memories of his children, to see him in a hell-hole and smiling and talking about his children. It warmed our hearts to know that he had those thoughts with him while he was over there.

His wife, Tiffany, did a screening in Washington. The children have seen photos of their daddy and they know who he was.

CP: How has your faith helped you through all of this?

TB: I think without my faith, it would have just crushed me, destroyed me. After we got the news that Bryan had been killed, we had all of the ceremonies that we were invited to attend. We were very busy that first month, but after we got home … I was unemployed at the time. We had the flag and the memories, but that's all we had. It started getting harder to get out of bed, and I couldn't find a reason to get out of bed. Beth, my wife, had the strength to carry both of our broken hearts. That's when we got the call about "The Hornet's Nest." And it got me out of bed and gave me a reason to carry on. I knew Bryan's spirit was strong, and I actually have a story about his spirit.

I had had a dream about Bryan – we were walking along a dirt road and he was dressed in full military gear. We found ourselves in a big, outdoor movie theater, which was a natural setting because we loved watching movies together. Then, on this blinding white movie screen, was the image of a glass coffin and Bryan standing next to it. He smiles at me, climbs into the coffin and lays down. As soon as his helmet hit the pillow, he became little boy Bryan. He lays there a minute, then stands up and he's warrior Bryan again. He gives me a half-salute and the screen goes blindingly white. I look over to my right, and Bryan is gone. I woke up at that moment and got dressed to tell Beth, and she's on the phone with my daughter-in-law, who is telling her that Bryan has just been killed in battle.

Bryan wanted me to honor the soldier and the man he had become. Of course, the shock of the dream and on the phone, and the Army colonel stopping by with a minister to give us the news … knowing that Bryan's spirit had visited me was energizing. So, reflecting on that, knowing that I will see him again and we will rejoice together again gave me a reason to join the story and mission of "The Hornet's Nest" and tell his story every chance I get.

Even the Scriptures were hollow to me – Bryan was everything and I lost that. We've talked to a lot of other families who have lost their children. There's a connection there that people can relate to. Pastor Joe Martin invited me to come speak and that, I think, was our first connection with the congregation, with Christians, to know that there are so many analogies between Christians and soldiers. Soldiers give their lives for our freedom, while Christ gave his life for our salvation.

CP: Do you keep in touch with the men who were stationed with Bryan?

TB: They have been really great about keeping in touch and letting us know how they're doing. Most of them have invisible wounds – not one came out of the valley changed. They know that I don't blame them or hold them responsible for Bryan's death. He was surrounded by men who loved him. I am very, very proud of him.

The movie is a catalyst for people to talk, for soldiers to talk about what happened to them while they served, and I hope that always continues. People need to be able to talk about the things they saw and experienced during their time of service. And I'm proud to be a part of that conversation and to be able to listen to those who need someone to listen to them.

"The Hornet's Nest" is out in select theaters now. For more information, click here.
Soldier remembered as friendly, athletic

The Associated Press

Nine years after he first enlisted, Bryan Burgess was making the Army his career.

The Cleburne, Texas, native had been deployed twice to Iraq and had less than a month left before his deployment to Afghanistan was set to end.

The 29-year-old died March 29 in Konar province. Another soldier also died in the attack.

His mother told officials at the Cleburne Independent School District that her son was killed during what appeared to be an ambush.

Burgess graduated from Cleburne High School in 1999, where he was a standout athlete who played soccer, baseball and football, and ran track.

“He was a sweet guy,” classmate Hillary Cochran told the school district for an article. “He always had a smile on his face. He was always friendly.”

Burgess was also an active member of Granbury Street Church of Christ.

He’s survived by a wife and two daughters. Burgess was assigned to Fort Campbell.

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