Operation Iraqi Freedom, Fallen Heroes, Iraq War 03/19/03

Ryan A Gloyer

Greenville, Pennsylvania

November 3, 2016

Age Military Rank Unit/Location
34 Army SFC

Company B, 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne)

Fort Carson, Colorado

 Killed in Kunduz, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained while engaging enemy forces.

From The Army Times armytimes.com 11/04/16

DoD identifies two Green Berets killed in deadly Afghan battle
By: Michelle Tan, November 4, 2016 (Photo Credit: Army)

The Defense Department on Friday released the names of two soldiers killed in Afghanistan. 

Capt. Andrew Byers and Sgt. 1st Class Ryan Gloyer died Thursday in Kunduz, Afghanistan, from wounds sustained while engaging enemy forces. 

Both men were assigned to B Company, 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group, at Fort Carson, Colorado. 

Byers and Gloyer were killed Thursday along with 26 civilians and three Afghan troops. 

Four other American troops were wounded. 

The soldiers came under fire during a “train, advise and assist mission” with Afghan troops, Defense Secretary Ash Carter said in a statement. The soldiers were working to clear a Taliban position and disrupt the group’s operations in Kunduz district. 

Byers, 30, was from Rolesville, North Carolina. He joined the Army in May 2008, arriving at Fort Carson in July 2014. 

Byers, a Special Forces officer, had deployed once to Afghanistan, once to the Democratic Republic of Congo, and served in Italy. 

His awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, three Army Commendation Medals, the Afghanistan Campaign Medal with Campaign Star, Iraq Campaign Medal with Campaign Star, the Combat Infantryman Badge, the Expert Infantryman Badge, the Parachutist and Military Free Fall Parachutists badges, the Ranger tab and Special Forces tab. 

Gloyer, 34, was from Denton, Pennsylvania. He joined the Army in December 2004 and had served at Fort Carson since January 2015. 

A Special Forces communications sergeant, Gloyer had deployed three times to Afghanistan and once to the Democratic Republic of Congo. 

Gloyer’s awards and decorations include the Bronze Star with V device, Bronze Star, Purple Heart, two Meritorious Service Medals, two Army Commendation Medals, the Afghanistan Campaign Medal with Campaign Star, the Combat Infantryman Badge, the Expert Infantryman Badge, the Parachutist Badge, the Ranger tab and the Special Forces tab. 

Afghan officials said they were still investigating the attack and its civilian casualties, some of which may have been caused by airstrikes, the Associated Press reported. Residents later carried more than a dozen corpses of the dead, including children, toward the local governor's office in a show of rage a year after American forces attacked an area hospital, according to the AP. 

Two senior Taliban commanders targeted in the raid were also killed, along with 63 other insurgents, Kunduz police chief Gen. Qasim Jangalbagh said, according to the AP. He said Afghan special forces carried out the raid and that he did not have any information about NATO involvement in the assault. The general identified the number of civilians killed, saying the count of 26 included members of the Taliban fighters' families. 

Brig. Gen. Charles Cleveland, briefing journalists in Brussels during a teleconference, said three Afghan troops were killed in the assault, the AP reported. Mohammad Radmanish, a deputy spokesman at the Afghan Defense Ministry, offered the same figure. 

In a later statement, Cleveland said that "friendly forces received direct fire and airstrikes were conducted to defend themselves" and an investigation was underway. He earlier described the assault as "not a common event," without elaborating. 

Fighting has been fierce in Kunduz province, as Taliban fighters briefly overran the city of Kunduz — the provincial capital with the same name — in early October, a show of strength by the insurgents that also highlighted the troubles facing Afghan forces 15 years into the war there, AP reported. The Taliban captured and held parts of Kunduz a year earlier as well before the city was liberated weeks later with the help of U.S. airstrikes, AP reported. 
From The Denver post denverpost.com 11/04/16

Two highly-decorated special forces soldiers killed in Afghanistan were from Fort Carson
Capt. Andrew D. Byers and Sgt. 1st Class Ryan A. Gloyer died of wounds sustained in Afghanistan

By JESSE PAUL |
PUBLISHED: November 4, 2016 at 1:03 pm | UPDATED: November 4, 2016 at 7:46 pm

Two highly-decorated special forces soldiers killed Thursday in Afghanistan were assigned to Fort Carson, the Pentagon announced on Friday, becoming the third and fourth members of the 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) stationed at the El Paso County base to die since the beginning of October.

Capt. Andrew D. Byers, 30, of Rolesville, N.C., and Sgt. 1st Class Ryan A. Gloyer, 34, of Greenville, Penn., died of wounds sustained while fighting enemy forces in Kunduz, Afghanistan, the Army says.

Byers and Gloyer — Green Berets — were assigned to Company B, 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) at the Mountain Post. Both were posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal and the Purple Heart Medal, according to a Fort Carson spokeswoman.

Byers had been in the Army for more than eight years, during which he was also deployed to Italy and last year to the Democratic Republic of Congo. He had been awarded the Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal, Meritorious Unit Award, as well as having earned an Expert Infantryman Badge.

Gloyer had been in the military for almost 12 years and had completed two other tours in Afghanistan and another last year to the Democratic Republic of Congo. He was a recipient of another Bronze Star Medal (one of his two was with valor), the Meritorious Service Medal, the Army Achievement Medal and the Valorous Unit Award. He too had earned an Expert Infantryman Badge.

Defense Secretary Ash Carter said in a statement that Byers and Gloyer and four other U.S. troops who also suffered injuries on Thursday were with Afghan forces as part of the United States’ train, advise and assist mission called Operation Freedom’s Sentinel.

“Some of our Afghan partners also died,” Carter said. “Our service members were doing their part to help the Afghans secure their own country while protecting our homeland from those who would do us harm. On this difficult day, please keep their families, friends and teammates in your thoughts and prayers. We will honor their sacrifice by finishing our important mission in Afghanistan.”

The Associated Press reports that according to defense officials, the U.S. soldiers had gotten off a helicopter and were moving on foot with Afghan forces doing clearing operations in Kunduz province. The defense officials said the troops came under fire and returned fire, but it wasn’t clear whether it was gunfire or other larger rounds.

In a statement, Fort Carson officials said Friday: “It is always hard to lose a part of our military family. Our thoughts and prayers are with Capt. Andrew D. Byers and Sgt. 1st Class Gloyer’s family and friends during this very difficult time.”

In early October, Staff Sgt. Adam S. Thomas, another 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) soldier from Fort Carson, was killed by an improvised explosive device blast in Afghanistan. Thomas, a highly decorated, eight-year member of the Army who had been deployed several times, was also supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel.

Last week, Pfc. Kyle J. Walls, 21, was found dead in a base barracks room. He too was a member of the 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) stationed at Fort Carson.

Walls, of Ponca City, Okla., arrived at the Mountain Post on Sept. 5 and had only been in the Army for 11 months. His death remains under investigation and authorities have not released details in the case.

Also on Friday three U.S. military members were killed in a shooting outside a military base in southern Jordan, the Pentagon said. Pentagon press secretary Peter Cook said the trio were in Jordan on a training mission and came under fire while driving into the base. He provided no other details and said U.S. officials are consulting with the Jordanian government to determine exactly what happened at the base.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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