Operation Iraqi Freedom, Fallen Heroes, Iraq War 03/19/03

Scott G Dimond

Franklin, New Hampshire

October 13, 2008

Age Military Rank Unit/Location
39 Army Cpl

3rd Battalion, 172nd Infantry Regiment (Mountain), New Hampshire Army National Guard

Milford, New Hampshire

 Killed in Kandahar, Afghanistan, when his vehicle struck an IED and his patrol was engaged in a small arms fire attack.

Franklin soldier killed in Afghanistan 
A former Franklin police officer serving in the New Hampshire Army National Guard was killed by an improvised explosive device Monday in Afghanistan , the Guard announced yesterday. 

Cpl. Scott Dimond, a 39-year-old father of four, was traveling in a military convoy that came under attack near the city of Lashkar Gah , in southern Afghanistan . He is the fifth soldier from New Hampshire killed in action in Afghanistan since fighting began seven years ago this month. 

Dimond’s unit deployed in January and was an embedded tactical training team with the Afghan National Army and police force. He had also been working full time in the Guard Honors Team, a Franklin-based ceremonial unit that travels statewide to honor soldiers killed in action. 

Cars packed the driveway and street in front of Dimond’s house in Franklin yesterday. A man out front, who identified himself as the fiance of Dimond’s sister, would not comment, saying the family needed time to grieve. 

Dimond, who graduated from Franklin High in 1987, was a police officer in Franklin from 1988 to 2006. Former Franklin police chief Doug Boyd, now a Franklin city councilor, hired Dimond. 

“He’s one of those guys, you wish you had five of them,” Boyd said. “He had a lot on the ball. He wanted to do a law enforcement career, and he wanted to do it in the town he grew up in.” 

Jim Ryba, a retired Franklin police lieutenant, added that Dimond helped modernize the city’s police force. “We were just getting on board with computers back then,” Ryba said, “and he was instrumental in that.” 

Dimond joined the Army National Guard after retiring from the force in 2006. He was part of C Company, 3rd of the 172nd Mountain Infantry Regiment. 

Richard Fredette of Webster is a retired sergeant major in the Guard and the current director of the honors team. 

He said Dimond joined the Guard at an age far older than the norm.
“Kids come in at 17, and Scott came to us when he was probably 36,” Fredette said. “There are kids right out of high school. It’s something Scott wanted. He was a career police officer in Franklin and decided he wanted to do his part with the military.” 

Dimond outdid other guardsmen during rigorous training, despite being more than twice the age of many recruits, according to Fredette. 

“He was a stellar performer in training,” Fredette said. “He got right out there with those 17-year-old kids, and he surpassed them in many situations, physically and with basic soldiering. He had a strong desire to be a member of the military, and he proved himself.” 

After training, in the spring of 2007, Dimond asked Fredette if he could join his outfit, a full-time job. The honors team pays tribute to veterans of all wars at their funerals. Fredette said teams of three - two who fold the American flag and present it to the family, one who plays taps - travel nearly every day of the week for military funerals. He and Dimond, who folded the flag, worked together often. 

“He’s been there with me many times as we’ve gone to the aircraft to bring our soldiers home from Afghanistan and Iraq ,” Fredette said. “We’re about ready to go get him. When they call us, we’re going to go to the airport and go pick Scott up.” 

Fredette said Dimond will be flown to Germany and then Dover , Del. , before arriving, most likely, in either Concord or Manchester . He will receive full military honors, which includes pallbearers, the playing of taps, a color guard and a rifle volley team of eight. 

Scott Dimond graduated in 1987 from Franklin High in New Hampshire . He was a police officer in Franklin from 1988 to 2006. 

Dimond joined the Army National Guard after retiring from the police force in 2006. He was part of C Company, 3rd of the 172nd Mountain Infantry Regiment, working as a mentor to the Afghan National Guard and national police force. He deployed in January to Afghanistan , as part of an Army Guard embedded tactical training team. 

Before he served in Afghanistan , Dimond was a member of the Guard Honors Team, which supports military funerals. The honors team pays tribute to veterans of all wars at their funerals by folding the American flag and presenting it to the family, and by playing taps. 

On October 10th, Corporal Diamond was traveling in a military convoy that came under enemy attack near Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province . He died from his injuries when an improvised explosive device (IED) exploded. 

A Franklin police officer is quoted in The Citizen: 

Fellow officer Joseph McCormack was very close to Dimond. 

"He lived for the Franklin Police Department," McCormack said. He referred to the officers within the department as "a family." He mentioned how Dimond was always there for his friends, whether in a professional or personal way, and said "he'd give you the shirt off his back." 

Dimond had many friends in the community, "He will be missed greatly," said McCormack. 

"He was a great guy, he worked very hard ... He will be missed," said Doug Boyd, former Franklin police chief. Boyd, who hired Dimond and eventually promoted him to sergeant, admired the officer's work ethic and said he really cared about his job. 

Scott Dimond was well-known in his hometown of Franklin . There is a video of a story done about him by NECN at this link. 

According to the Boston Globe: 

The city of Franklin , N.H., was mourning yesterday after National Guard officials confirmed that one of their own - described as a likable, longtime municipal police officer - was killed in action in southern Afghanistan ... 

"He was a very likable, very approachable fellow, a real asset to the city," Merrifield said. "We are very saddened, but we obviously appreciate his service both as a police officer and as a National Guardsman - always putting himself between us and danger throughout his career."... 

"Our thoughts and prayers are with Scott's family during this time of deep sadness," said Major General Kenneth Clark, adjutant general of the New Hampshire National Guard. "May they take some comfort in knowing that Scott was committed to serving others . . . His sacrifice for our freedom will never be forgotten." 

Corporal Dimond is survived by his wife of 12 years, Jennifer, and four children. The youngest child is Dimond's 4-year-old daughter, Madison. 

The Guard Honors Team plans to provide full military honors at the funeral of their comrade and friend, Scott Dimond. 

FRANKLIN — In addition to family members, friends and other loved ones, hundreds of people, including Gov. John Lynch, police officers, firefighters and members of the New Hampshire National Guard and other military branches all gathered to pay final respects to Cpl. Scott G. Dimond, 39, the local National Guardsman and retired Franklin police officer who died Oct. 13 while serving in Afghanistan. 

The funeral took place in the gymnasium of Franklin Middle School and two tented areas were set up outside, where people, once the gym was full, could go to watch the service on flat-screen televisions. 

Following the service, a procession on foot of guardsmen and guardswomen and police officers, followed by cars carrying close relatives of Dimond, escorted the hearse carrying Dimond's casket to the Franklin Cemetery , where his body was buried with full military honors. 

He died from injuries sustained when the military convoy he was traveling in came under heavy fire and an improvised explosive devise denoted near him. The attack occurred near Lashkar Gah in Afghanistan 's Helmand Province . 

Dimond was a soldier with C Company, 3rd of the 172nd Mountain Infantry Regiment, and was deployed to Afghanistan in January as part of an embedded tactical training team providing training to members of the Afghan National Army and the country's police force. Before deploying to Afghanistan , he also served as a member of the Guard Honors Team.

Dimond served on the Franklin Police Department for 18 years, from 1988-2006, and attained the rank of sergeant before retiring. He then joined the state Army National Guard full time.

He leaves behind his wife, Jennifer, son Luke, and daughters Ashlee, Alexis and Madison Dimond, all of Franklin.

Leland C. Dimond, of Belmont , spoke of the pride he felt for his son, pride that he said he should have expressed more often. Leland Dimond said he and his son had come to believe in the same principles over the years, the principles of "God, family and country."

He said Scott Dimond's belief in those principles were evident in the way he lived.

"Scott loved God, he loved his family, and he was a true American," Leland Dimond said. 

He said he has been proud of his son since the day he was born and is even more proud of him today. 

"I'm so proud of you for giving your life for our country — there is no greater sacrifice," he said.

Scott Dimond's sisters, Angela Amaral of Sarasota, Fla., and Leanna Thackery of Berlin, came to the podium together, both in tears. 

Amaral said she was thankful for every day that her brother was part of her life.

"I will cherish every hug, every kiss, every laugh and every tear I shared with my brother," Amaral said. 

She added that joining the military was something her brother always wanted to do.

"I'm truly proud of him, for he was a soldier and a hero," Amaral said. 

Thackery spoke with a quavering voice broken by tears, but expressed her conviction that her brother is now in heaven. 

"We don't do this just in sorrow but in celebration of your wonderful life," Thackery said. 

Scott Dimond's uncle, Jean Dimond, spoke of a nephew that was more like a son in many ways and one who, even as a little boy, seemed to possess wisdom beyond his years. 

Yet Dimond's uncle also recalled a boy who was fearless and up for any challenge, such as being the only child in the neighborhood brave enough to ride a friend's red wagon down a hill. 

"He had such a wonderful outlook on life," Jean Dimond said. 

He said later, when Scott Dimond was in school and on the football team, he excelled at sports and liked being part of the team. When the teen injured his knee, Jean Dimond said, the boy was heartbroken that he couldn't be part of the team for a while. 

After high school, he said, Scott Dimond signed up with the Marines with similar enthusiasm and was equally upset when the knee injury prevented him from completing training. Not one to be down for too long; however, Scott Dimond decided to become a member of the Franklin Police Department. 

"That was the little boy who grew up always wanting to serve others, always wanting to help," Jean Dimond said.

State Army National Guard Sgt. William Whitcher, Scott Dimond's cousin and a member of his Guard unit, paused to hold back tears as he spoke of a promise he and his cousin had made to come home together. 

He said the last time he saw his cousin alive, they had met in Afghanistan and had talked for hours, sharing stories, confidences and tears. They even traded one of their dog tags with each other and made the promise to go home together. 

"Scott completed exactly what he set out to do," Whitcher said. "to make it safer for everyone here."

Whitcher said even as children, both he and Scott Dimond aspired to military careers and took playing army to a whole new level by digging trenches and fox holes in the backyard. 

Later, Whitcher said they joined the Marines together. 

Whitcher said when he came home from the Marines and was at loose ends as to what to do with his life, it was Scott Dimond who encouraged him to become a policeman, too.

Whitcher started on the Northfield Police Department and is now a member of the State Police.

"He was always there for me," Whitcher said.

Whitcher said when he decided to join the New Hampshire National Guard, Scott Dimond encouraged him. 

"When I told him I was going to Afghanistan , he said 'You don't think you're going without me Someone's got to get you home safe,'" Whitcher said. 

The city of Franklin , N.H., was mourning yesterday after National Guard officials confirmed that one of their own - described as a likable, longtime municipal police officer - was killed in action in southern Afghanistan . 

Corporal Scott Dimond, 39, died from injuries from an improvised explosive device after his military convoy was attacked Monday near Lashkar Gah in Helmand Province , said Major Greg Heilshorn, spokesman for the New Hampshire National Guard. 

Mayor Ken Merrifield of Franklin said the community is grieving. 

"Our hearts go out to the Dimond family," Merrifield said. "The community is deeply shocked. I've been receiving phone calls all day." 

Merrifield remembered Dimond's years on the police force, from 1988 to 2006, as an officer and a sergeant. 

"He was a very likable, very approachable fellow, a real asset to the city," Merrifield said. "We are very saddened, but we obviously appreciate his service both as a police officer and as a National Guardsman - always putting himself between us and danger throughout his career." 

Dimond, a Guard member since 2006, served with C Company, Third Battalion, 172d Mountain Infantry Regiment, working as a mentor to the Afghan National Guard and national police force. He deployed in January as part of an Army Guard embedded tactical training team. 

Before he served in Afghanistan , Dimond was a member of the Guard Honors Team, which supports military funerals, Heilshorn said. 

Dimond's family could not be reached for comment. 

"Our thoughts and prayers are with Scott's family during this time of deep sadness," said Major General Kenneth Clark, adjutant general of the New Hampshire National Guard. "May they take some comfort in knowing that Scott was committed to serving others . . . His sacrifice for our freedom will never be forgotten." 

Governor John Lynch issued a statement, offering his thanks and condolences to the Dimond family. "My thoughts and prayers, and those of my wife, Susan, are with the family," Lynch said. 

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